Debt, unemployment, cost of living linked to aggression, temper issues, says expert

19 Jun 2023 09:10am
Photo for illustrative purpose only
Photo for illustrative purpose only
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SHAH ALAM - Experts have identified three significant factors that contribute to the growing concern of Malaysians struggling to manage their temper.

These factors include the escalating cost of living, mounting debt, and increasing unemployment rates.

A coach and motivator from Malaysian Hypnosis Academy Mohd Huridin Samuri Said the three factors were identified after analysing 150 patients who received treatment at the therapy centre in the previous year, in comparison to 80 patients in 2021.

"The current situation such as the rising cost of living, debt and unemployement can trigger temper.

"When they feel the pressure, they would vent their anger to reduce the anger," he told Sinar.

Huridin said an individuals' hot-tempered attitude can also be influenced by past traumatic experiences, such as a history of abuse, bullying, or being abandoned by their family.

He said individuals who have endured such traumas often develop a deep-seated rage as a means of self-protection as they fear being hurt again.

"This group would also manipulate people around them in their own way. These individuals will shout at anyone who disobeys their order," he said.

The hot-tempered attitude among Malaysians has gained significant attention recently following a spate of videos of flights or road bullies on social media platforms.

Recent incidents such as "abang sado baju merah" incident where a male driver assaulted a female driver in Cameron Highlands and a motorcyclist striking a female driver with a helmet following an accident in Balik Pulau, Penang.

In addition, CPC International Consultant Psychologist Dr Noor Aishah Rosli has shed light on the impact of anger not only on adults but also on children.

Anger can affect individuals of all ages and it is crucial to address this issue by considering the emotional well-being and anger management skills of both adults and children.

Aishah said she once treated a five-year-old patient who often rebelled and refused to listen to their parents.

She said medical checks showed that child's behavior was influenced by their parents.

"Children have this trait of loving to examine and follow how the people close to them behave. So if their parents are hot-tempered then it is not surprising the children would exhibit the same behavior.

"When the cause of the problem is identified, we need to treat the cause first.

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"If the parents are the cause then they also need to seek treatment," she said.