Pedestrian deaths in US hits 41-year high in 2022: Report

28 Jun 2023 08:58am
Pedestrians cross a road in Hong Kong on July 16, 2021. Photo for illustrative purposes only. Photo by Isaac Lawrence/AFP FILE PIX
Pedestrians cross a road in Hong Kong on July 16, 2021. Photo for illustrative purposes only. Photo by Isaac Lawrence/AFP FILE PIX
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WASHINGTON - More than 7,500 pedestrians were killed on U.S. roadways in 2022, the most pedestrian deaths since 1981, said a new report based on government data.

Drivers struck and killed at least 7,508 people walking in the United States last year, according to the report released earlier this month by the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA), the national organisation that represents state highway safety agencies.

The report stated that the total number of pedestrian deaths in 2022 increased one per cent from the year before.

Pedestrian deaths went up a shocking 77 percent between 2010 and 2021, compared to a 25 percent increase in all other traffic fatalities, the report found.

Larger and heavier vehicles are playing an increasing role in pedestrian fatalities. The number of pedestrians struck and killed by an SUV has surged 120 percent since 2012, compared to a 26 percent increase for passenger cars, according to the report.

Forty-nine states and Washington D.C. provided pedestrian fatality data for the report. California saw the highest number of pedestrian deaths in 2022, with 1,100 killed, while New Mexico had the highest rate of pedestrian deaths in the country, with 4.40 pedestrian deaths per 100,000 people.

"Every day, 20 people go for a walk and do not return home. These are people living their daily lives -- commuting to and from school and work, picking up groceries, walking the dog, getting some exercise -- who died suddenly and violently," said GHSA Chief Executive Officer Jonathan Adkins.

"The saddest part is that these crashes are preventable. We know what works -- better-designed infrastructure, lower speeds, addressing risky driving behaviors that pose a danger to people walking," Adkins added, noting the necessity and significance to reverse the awful trend and protect people on foot. - XINHUA

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