Disappointment over unfulfilled promises tops 'K-word' comment for Indian community - Experts

KOUSALYA SELVAM
KOUSALYA SELVAM
01 Jan 2024 10:01am
Addressing the possibility of the Indian community shifting their support to MIC or Perikatan Nasional (PN), expert deemed the chances low, especially with Pas dominating PN. - Photo by Bernama
Addressing the possibility of the Indian community shifting their support to MIC or Perikatan Nasional (PN), expert deemed the chances low, especially with Pas dominating PN. - Photo by Bernama
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SHAH ALAM - While Prime Minister Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim's recent 'K-word' remark drew criticism, experts point out that unfulfilled promises from the 15th General Election hold greater concern for the Indian community.

This sentiment arises from various incidents that have left a mark on the Indian community, such as Anwar's absence at Indian festivals, his response to an Indian matriculation student, and the recent use of the 'K-word.'

Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin Head of International Relations Department Dr Hussain Yusri Zawawi said that these comments represent the views of a small section of the Indian community.

"While acknowledging Anwar's actions against the community, where accusations against him provide an excuse not to participate in Indian community celebrations, we must understand that these comments are from a minority within the Indian community.

"Most Indians do not consider Anwar's non-participation in celebrations a significant issue," he told Sinar Daily.

On Anwar's interaction with the matriculation student questioning the quota system, Hussain acknowledged the rough approach but emphasised that the majority understood the reality Anwar is trying to convey.

Hussain argued that the Indian community is primarily concerned with the implications of policies and promises made during the 15th General Election.

"The discussions about Anwar being rude to the Indian community are largely political material for a few parties.

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Addressing the possibility of the Indian community shifting their support to MIC or Perikatan Nasional (PN), Hussain deemed the chances low, especially with Pas dominating PN.

"A strong religious influence in Pas will be less convincing to Indian voters to switch to Perikatan Nasional.

"While a significant portion of the Indian community may be disappointed with Anwar's performance in dealing with issues, it is not a factor prompting them to shift their support to other parties," he added.

In a related matter, political analyst Ei Sun Oh highlighted the socio-economic challenges faced by the Indian community since the 1990s and stressed that Indian voters remain a sizable and influential demographic.

"The Indian community broadly in this country faces many socio-economic challenges.

"They are not a minority to be ignored.

"Nowadays, the government must value Indian voters, and the Indian voters are mature enough not to make impulsive decisions to revert to MIC or PN.

"They have no choice but to stick around a little longer," he said.