Influencers to blame for growing disinterest in education?

The lack of guidance, coupled with the influence of certain social media narratives suggesting success and wealth can be attained without SPM, is among the factors contributing to more than 10,000 candidates missing the exam.

Siti Aisyah Mohamad
Siti Aisyah Mohamad
30 May 2024 08:06pm
Image for illustrative purposes only.
Image for illustrative purposes only.
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In the current era of globalisation, higher education serves as the cornerstone of human resource development for any country, yet the reality shows that the current generation is increasingly uninterested in pursuing further studies.

What is even more concerning is the existence of individuals who are willing to skip important exams like the Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM) without much consideration.

Sinar reported on Wednesday that the lack of guidance, coupled with the influence of certain social media narratives suggesting success and wealth can be attained without SPM, is among the factors contributing to more than 10,000 candidates missing the exam.

Parent Action Group for Education (PAGE) chairman Datin Noor Azimah Abdul Rahim said that students are easily swayed by the allure of making easy money without the need for any qualifications.

It is undeniable that the perspective of most young people is shaped by social media, inundated with low-quality and uneducated influences, particularly after the Covid-19 pandemic.

During the Movement Control Order (MCO), various social media applications emerged, causing these groups to spend more time on these platforms and become easily influenced.

Many influencers have become idols and role models for some segments of society and young people, primarily due to their wealth, fame and physical appearance.

What's even more distressing is the presence of influencers who downplay the value of education with statements like 'you don't need to study high to drive luxury cars,' which portray themselves as the epitome of success.

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Ultimately, this materialistic perspective affects the thinking of young people, who now begin to define success based on wealth and material possessions.

As a result, it's not surprising that some young people start dreaming of becoming rich quickly like their idols, forgetting about the realities of life.

Some of these young people, inspired by their idols, ultimately see social media as their goal or platform for success, rather than striving for higher education.

Therefore, the government needs to take more aggressive and proactive steps to attract the interest of young people in pursuing education, whether through academic or technical education.

Additionally, it's hoped that these influencers can create content that is genuinely beneficial for the better future of the country.